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2014 Joseph P. Riley Jr. Award for Leadership in Urban Design



Las Vegas, NV, February 27, 2014—The American Architectural Foundation (AAF) and The United States Conference of Mayors (USCM) announced today that Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman (2011–Present) and Former Mayor Oscar B. Goodman (1999–2011) of Las Vegas will share the fourth annual Joseph P. Riley Jr. Award for Leadership in Urban Design. Mayor and Mr. Goodman will be honored nationally at the 25th annual Accent on Architecture Gala, presented by AAF, on Thursday, April 24, 2014, in Washington, D.C.

The Riley Award is issued each year to a mayor whose commitment to excellence in urban design has helped elevate the quality of life for that mayor’s constituency. The Goodmans are being honored because during their consecutive administrations, they have helped lead Las Vegas into an urban renaissance focused on downtown revitalization. “The Goodmans have had the foresight and drive to turn the city of Las Vegas into a cultural destination,” said USCM CEO & Executive Director Tom Cochran. “They both have had the vision and ability to recognize that arts and culture attract youth, and youth attracts jobs and economic growth.”

Examples of the outstanding urban design efforts championed by the Goodmans include: the Fremont East Entertainment District, the Smith Center for the Performing Arts (principal design team: David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc., Fisher Dachs Associates, Akustiks, and HKS Architects, Inc.), the National Museum of Organized Crime & Law Enforcement (aka the Mob Museum; principal design team: Westlake Reed Leskosky (WRL) and Gallagher & Associates), and the Frank Gehry-designed Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health.

The Goodmans have also helped guide the design and construction in downtown Las Vegas of a new City Hall (principal design team: Elkus Manfredi Architects with executive architect JMA Architecture Studio), which has in turn catalyzed a series of mixed-use developments projected to create 13,000 permanent jobs, $4.1 billion in private investment, and $16–20 billion in new tax revenue. At the same time, the building itself has proven to be a model of sustainability. Its 33 solar trees produce approximately 290,000 kilowatt hours of energy annually, while these and its other sustainability features help to reduce greenhouse gas omissions by 2,400 tons and energy costs by $400,000 each year.

“When we started in 1999, we had a vision for a downtown rich in art, culture and architecture, and we’ve come so far since then,” the former Mayor said. “We now have buildings in the downtown that are architecturally known around the world, and I am proud to have been a part of that progress.”

Contacts:

Diana Paul, City of Las Vegas / 702-229-6582 (O) or 702-271-3030 / dpaul@LasVegasNevada.GOV
Lina Garcia, USCM / 202-341-6113 / lgarcia@usmayors.org
Mark de Groh, AAF / 202-787-1008 / mdegroh@archfoundation.org

In this photo provided by the Las Vegas News Bureau, announcement at the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health that Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman and Former Mayor Oscar B. Goodman will share the fourth annual Joseph P. Riley Jr. Award for Leadership in Urban Design, which will be presented April 24, 2014 at the Accent on Architecture Gala in Washington, D.C. Pictured (l-r): USCM CEO & Executive Director Tom Cochran, Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman, Former Las Vegas Mayor Oscar B. Goodman, Senior Managing Director of SWS Larry Ruvo, and AAF President & CEO Ron Bogle. Thursday, February 27, 2014. (Photo/Las Vegas News Bureau, Glenn Pinkerton)

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The American Architectural Foundation has been dedicated to advancing the role of architecture and design in American society since its founding in 1943 by the American Institute of Architects.

In its 75 years in existence the Foundation’s work has taken many forms — from educational programming and exhibitions in its early years to large-scale design initiatives and programs —all of which serve to create a rich legacy.

As the managing partner of the Mayors’ Institute on City Design for twenty years, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the United States Conference of Mayors, the Foundation helped move the needle on design and cities. And, through its other signature programs like Save America’s Treasures in partnership with National Parks Service, the Sustainable Cities Design Academy, and Design for Learning, the Foundation has provided critical design leadership training and technical assistance to hundreds of elected officials, education leaders, business leaders, and other key decision makers in the design process.

In recent years, cities and civic leaders have embraced design and design thinking in a way that could not have been imagined when the Foundation begin its work back in 1943 — and AAF’s role in this transformation is a source of great pride for the Foundation. With this increased interest in the role of design in shaping our cities came a proliferation of new organizations to support and facilitate this cultural shift. These advances in the role of design in American society and changes in the nonprofit design sector, coupled with the departure of the organization’s longest-serving CEO, prompted the Foundation’s Board to embark on an intensive and lengthy process to examine the ongoing role and work of the Foundation.

As the Board of Regents reflected on the positive changes of the cultural value of design, the accomplishments of the Foundation, and how the legacy of the Foundation’s work is being carried out by its former staff in new roles and organizations across the country, they reached the conclusion that the American Architectural Foundation had accomplished what it set out to do. As a result, the Foundation began to complete its remaining programs and wind down its operations in the Summer of 2018 and the organization’s endowments have been distributed to allied organizations. The Foundation’s research and reports will remain available on its website as a resource to the field.

The Foundation’s work would not have been possible without the incredible talents of its many staff over the decades, the generous support of its funders, and the tireless dedication of its civic & design partners across the country. The Board remains deeply proud of the significant contributions Foundation has made in its 75-year history and would like to acknowledge that this would not have been possible without the efforts, dedication, and support from so many of you.