- American Architectural Foundation - http://www.archfoundation.org -

Treasure Map: Mapping the Impact of Save America’s Treasures

Click here for the full map! [1]

 

The American Architectural Foundation, in partnership with the National Park Service (NPS), the President’s Committee on the Arts & Humanities (PCAH), the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), has created a new comprehensive map [1] of all of the Save America’s Treasures [2] (SAT) projects that were awarded grants between 1999 and 2010, the last year that the program was funded.

As you can see from the map, these projects were undertaken across the country, and preserved and documented our irreplaceable shared national heritage. The map pins are grouped by agency (NPS, NEA, NEH, and IMLS) and then by congressional district within each agency, but if you click the magnifying glass icon, you can search by state (using the two-letter postal abbreviation), congressional district (e.g. for Virginia’s 3rd District, type “VA-003”), ZIP code, project title, or granting agency.

Explore the map to see where your nearest SAT project is, and if you’d like to see funding for SAT restored, please reach out to your Representative [3] and let them know how refunding SAT can help spur private investment, education, and training in your community!

This map presents Save America’s Treasures awards made by the National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, Institute of Museum and Library Services and the National Park Service between 1999 and 2010.  These awards were geolocated by their ZIP codes, so pin placement is approximate. In all, there are 1,241 SAT  projects in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Midway Islands.

[1]

Established in 1999, the Save America’s Treasures program is managed by the National Park Service, with the National Endowment Agencies, to preserve and protect nationally significant properties and collections for future generations of Americans. 

. [4]

.